The official journal of

WFCCN

In association with

EFCCNa

FLECI

Indexed in

CINAHL
EBSCO
BNI

More about Connect journal

What makes Connect different?

The purpose of the journal is to facilitate international communication and collaboration on critical care practice and research. The concept of making Connections embraces all of these ideas, hence the main title of the journal is Connect.

The editors want to encourage discussion about critical care practice innovations and the journal provides a range of opportunities for nurses and practitioners to communicate about their practice. It also aims to empower persons with a critical illness experience and their families to have a voice and to be able to inform the critical care community through making their perspectives, struggles and successes visible.

The aim of Connect is to be the voice of critical care nurses and allied practitioners world-wide. In this context, the editors recognise the challenge of communicating in a single language and intend that no article should be rejected on the basis of language, and that all authors will be offered support from the editorial board. Furthermore, Connect editors are currently working with colleagues in Latin America and the WFCCN to develop the journal languages further.

Making Connections - The Connections theme is developed throughout the journal and there are several regular features, to which all critical care colleagues – from anywhere in the world - are invited to contribute:

  • Research Connections (research reports, abstracts, news)
  • Clinical Connections (practice: ideas, evidence-informed care, development, patient-engagement, collaborative practice, review articles, case studies, news, information, support, equipment)
  • Global Connections (world news, information, exchange programmes)
  • Research Connections (research, abstracts, news)
  • Conference Connections (conference news, reports, adverts, information)
  • Connecting through reflections (practitioners, individuals and families reflecting on their experiences of critical care)